FUCK YEAH SOUTH ASIA!

FUCK YEAH SOUTH ASIA is devoted to anything and everything about India, Pakistan, Afghanistan, Bangladesh, Sri Lanka, Nepal, Bhutan, Kashmir and the Maldives. This includes (but is not limited to) natural beauty, music, film, history, literature, news and politics, food, discussion of the diaspora, language lessons and much more. We feel that the view of South Asia that is often presented is very flat and one-dimensional and we hope to do our small bit to change that.

Members: kadalkavithaigal / sukoon / inautumn-inkashmir / waveofeuphoriaa / hinduthug / mehreenkasana / inlovewiththepractice / neharaysays / sombhatt / joethought

Posts tagged "development"

pakistani:

Pakistani chef spices up American cooking show
“You want to go to university to become a bawarchi (cook)?” – This is the first reaction Fatima Ali, 22, would get when she would tell friends at a highly competitive school in Karachi about her aspirations to become a chef.
While friends were applying to Ivy Leagues and Oxbridge, up to five or six universities at a time, Ali applied to just one; a culinary institute in upstate New York.
While her mother supported her decision, her father, a well-known barrister in Lahore, initially urged her to apply to law schools instead, finally coming around after much persuasion. For 16-year-old Ali, there was no two ways about it – she started cooking at five and this would be her future.
Single-minded in her goal, her stubbornness combined with passion eventually helped her win an episode of the reality cooking show ‘Chopped’ which aired on June 12 on The Food Network in the United States. (complete news)
Follow us on Facebook | Twitter or Submit something or Just Ask! 

pakistani:

Pakistani chef spices up American cooking show

“You want to go to university to become a bawarchi (cook)?” – This is the first reaction Fatima Ali, 22, would get when she would tell friends at a highly competitive school in Karachi about her aspirations to become a chef.

While friends were applying to Ivy Leagues and Oxbridge, up to five or six universities at a time, Ali applied to just one; a culinary institute in upstate New York.

While her mother supported her decision, her father, a well-known barrister in Lahore, initially urged her to apply to law schools instead, finally coming around after much persuasion. For 16-year-old Ali, there was no two ways about it – she started cooking at five and this would be her future.

Single-minded in her goal, her stubbornness combined with passion eventually helped her win an episode of the reality cooking show ‘Chopped’ which aired on June 12 on The Food Network in the United States. (complete news)


Follow us on Facebook | Twitter or Submit something or Just Ask

pakistani:

Pak-India trade: New routes, bank branches emerge on the horizon
ISLAMABAD: It was the first visit by an Indian commerce minister to Islamabad in three decades  but the firsts did not end there.
The neighbours signed three trade pacts and laid the groundwork for not only opening more land trade routes, but also bank branches in each other’s countries for the first time since their creation.
Representatives of the central banks are scheduled to meet in Mumbai next month to discuss this, said a joint statement issued after the talks. (Complete news item)
Follow us on Facebook | Twitter or Submit something or Just Ask!

pakistani:

Pak-India trade: New routes, bank branches emerge on the horizon

ISLAMABAD: It was the first visit by an Indian commerce minister to Islamabad in three decades  but the firsts did not end there.

The neighbours signed three trade pacts and laid the groundwork for not only opening more land trade routes, but also bank branches in each other’s countries for the first time since their creation.

Representatives of the central banks are scheduled to meet in Mumbai next month to discuss this, said a joint statement issued after the talks. (Complete news item)


Follow us on Facebook | Twitter or Submit something or Just Ask!

pakistani:

The doctor who made history (By Suhail Yusuf)
 
KARACHI: Dr. Tariq Ali Bangash who directed Pakistan’s first successful cadaver liver transplant at Sheikh Zayed Hospital Lahore shares his experiences regarding the historic achievement.
The inspiring lecture was organised by Sindh Institute of Urology and Transplantation (SIUT). Dr. Bangash said that Dr. Adeeb Rizvi has always been his inspiration and his father always encouraged him to be like Dr. Rizvi and nothing else. He said that Dr. Rizvi also did the homework of the first cadaver liver transplant in Pakistan.
The cadaveric liver transplant is a process in which the liver of a deceased person is transferred into a patient. In this case, the liver was donated by Mohammad Arsalan, a 16-year-old matriculation student from Lahore. Arsalan had been wounded and was admitted to the hospital three days before the transplantation and had asked his parents to donate his liver in the case of his death.
On August 13, 2011, Pakistani media highlighted the first successful attempt of a liver transplant. A team of professionals led by Dr. Bangash retrieved the liver at 3:30 pm; the transplant process started at 9:00 pm and finished the process at 5:00 am.
Read more about it here

pakistani:

The doctor who made history (By Suhail Yusuf)

KARACHI: Dr. Tariq Ali Bangash who directed Pakistan’s first successful cadaver liver transplant at Sheikh Zayed Hospital Lahore shares his experiences regarding the historic achievement.

The inspiring lecture was organised by Sindh Institute of Urology and Transplantation (SIUT). Dr. Bangash said that Dr. Adeeb Rizvi has always been his inspiration and his father always encouraged him to be like Dr. Rizvi and nothing else. He said that Dr. Rizvi also did the homework of the first cadaver liver transplant in Pakistan.

The cadaveric liver transplant is a process in which the liver of a deceased person is transferred into a patient. In this case, the liver was donated by Mohammad Arsalan, a 16-year-old matriculation student from Lahore. Arsalan had been wounded and was admitted to the hospital three days before the transplantation and had asked his parents to donate his liver in the case of his death.

On August 13, 2011, Pakistani media highlighted the first successful attempt of a liver transplant. A team of professionals led by Dr. Bangash retrieved the liver at 3:30 pm; the transplant process started at 9:00 pm and finished the process at 5:00 am.

Read more about it here

pakistani:

Wondrous feats: One student’s journey from small-town Balochistan to Harvard University
 
Located on the outskirts of Quetta, is the barren valley of Mariabad where the Hazara lead slow-paced lives. These tribal people, living in narrow brick huts speckled along the rugged hillside, typically sell loose cloth, sweaters or tea for their livelihood.
Like most poor people, their aspirations rarely go beyond sustaining themselves in this underdeveloped nook of Balochistan. Many of them live and die in Mariabad — unaware of the complex concerns and tremendous pace of life in urban centres like Karachi and Lahore.
But one student — the son of a trader who sold Quaid-e-Azam style caps in Mariabad for a living — dared to tread a radically different path. Karrar Hussain Jaffar transcended the confines of an obscure town in Balochistan, where people rarely educate themselves beyond matriculation, to study at the prestigious Harvard University. His story — a narrative about the wondrous possibilities of equal educational opportunities — is truly inspirational. (for complete news click here and for an equally inspirational video of Karrar and LUMS NOP click here)

pakistani:

Wondrous feats: One student’s journey from small-town Balochistan to Harvard University

Located on the outskirts of Quetta, is the barren valley of Mariabad where the Hazara lead slow-paced lives. These tribal people, living in narrow brick huts speckled along the rugged hillside, typically sell loose cloth, sweaters or tea for their livelihood.

Like most poor people, their aspirations rarely go beyond sustaining themselves in this underdeveloped nook of Balochistan. Many of them live and die in Mariabad — unaware of the complex concerns and tremendous pace of life in urban centres like Karachi and Lahore.

But one student — the son of a trader who sold Quaid-e-Azam style caps in Mariabad for a living — dared to tread a radically different path. Karrar Hussain Jaffar transcended the confines of an obscure town in Balochistan, where people rarely educate themselves beyond matriculation, to study at the prestigious Harvard University. His story — a narrative about the wondrous possibilities of equal educational opportunities — is truly inspirational. (for complete news click here and for an equally inspirational video of Karrar and LUMS NOP click here)

pakistani:

Dr. Umar Saif named one of the World’s Top Young Innovators by MIT
Lahore, Pakistan – August 23, 2011 – Lahore University of Management Sciences (LUMS) today announced that Dr. Umar Saif, Associate Professor at the School of Science of Engineering, has been recognized by MIT Technology Review as one of the top 35 innovators (TR35) in the world. In the last decade, this is the first time a Pakistani has been selected for the prestigious TR35 award.
 
“The TR35 recognizes the world’s top 35 young innovators that are radically transforming technology as we know it. Their work – spanning medicine, computing, communications, energy, electronics and nanotechnology — is changing our world”, according to MIT Technology Review.
Dr. Umar Saif has been honored for his work on technologies for the developing-world. Technologies developed by Dr. Saif’s research group and startups are used by Millions of people in the developing-world, especially BitMate, that enhances the speed of Internet in the developing-world using peer-to-peer technology, and SMSall.pk, Pakistan’s largest SMS Social Network which has sent close to 4 Billion SMS for users in Pakistan.
Dr. Umar Saif joins an elite group of researchers and entrepreneurs selected over the last decade. Previous winners include Larry Page and Sergey Brin, the co-founders of Google; Mark Zuckerberg, founder of Facebook; Jonathan Ive, the chief designer at Apple; David Karp, founder of Tumbler; Harvard Professor Alán Aspuru-Guzik for his work on Quantum computers; and MIT Neuroscientist Ed Boyden, one of the inventors of the emerging field of optogenetics, which makes it possible to control neurons with light.
For complete article by Jehanara, click here. 

Follow us on Facebook | Twitter or Submit something or Just Ask!

pakistani:

Dr. Umar Saif named one of the World’s Top Young Innovators by MIT

Lahore, Pakistan – August 23, 2011 – Lahore University of Management Sciences (LUMS) today announced that Dr. Umar Saif, Associate Professor at the School of Science of Engineering, has been recognized by MIT Technology Review as one of the top 35 innovators (TR35) in the world. In the last decade, this is the first time a Pakistani has been selected for the prestigious TR35 award.

“The TR35 recognizes the world’s top 35 young innovators that are radically transforming technology as we know it. Their work – spanning medicine, computing, communications, energy, electronics and nanotechnology — is changing our world”, according to MIT Technology Review.

Dr. Umar Saif has been honored for his work on technologies for the developing-world. Technologies developed by Dr. Saif’s research group and startups are used by Millions of people in the developing-world, especially BitMate, that enhances the speed of Internet in the developing-world using peer-to-peer technology, and SMSall.pk, Pakistan’s largest SMS Social Network which has sent close to 4 Billion SMS for users in Pakistan.

Dr. Umar Saif joins an elite group of researchers and entrepreneurs selected over the last decade. Previous winners include Larry Page and Sergey Brin, the co-founders of Google; Mark Zuckerberg, founder of Facebook; Jonathan Ive, the chief designer at Apple; David Karp, founder of Tumbler; Harvard Professor Alán Aspuru-Guzik for his work on Quantum computers; and MIT Neuroscientist Ed Boyden, one of the inventors of the emerging field of optogenetics, which makes it possible to control neurons with light.

For complete article by Jehanara, click here

Follow us on Facebook | Twitter or Submit something or Just Ask!

Kerala, a state in India, is a bizarre anomaly among developing nations, a place that offers real hope for the future of the Third World. Though not much larger than Maryland, Kerala has a population as big as California’s and a per capita annual income of less than $300. But its infant mortality rate is very low, its literacy rate among the highest on Earth, and its birthrate below America’s and falling faster. Kerala’s residents live nearly as long as Americans or Europeans. Though mostly a land of paddy-covered plains, statistically Kerala stands out as the Mount Everest of social development; there’s truly no place like it.

Bill McKibben (via joethought)