FUCK YEAH SOUTH ASIA!

FUCK YEAH SOUTH ASIA is devoted to anything and everything about India, Pakistan, Afghanistan, Bangladesh, Sri Lanka, Nepal, Bhutan, Kashmir and the Maldives. This includes (but is not limited to) natural beauty, music, film, history, literature, news and politics, food, discussion of the diaspora, language lessons and much more. We feel that the view of South Asia that is often presented is very flat and one-dimensional and we hope to do our small bit to change that.

Members: kadalkavithaigal / sukoon / inautumn-inkashmir / waveofeuphoriaa / hinduthug / mehreenkasana / inlovewiththepractice / neharaysays / sombhatt / joethought

Posts tagged "Karachi"

Taliban in Karachi: the real story

ON the evening of March 13, Director Orangi Pilot Project Perween Rahman was shot and killed by masked men half a kilometre from her office just off Manghopir Road in Karachi. The police were quick to point a finger at the Tehreek-i-Taliban Pakistan (TTP).

In an “encounter” the very next day, they killed Qari Bilal who they claimed was a leader of the TTP and the mastermind behind Ms Rahman’s murder. Many in the development sector, however, believe she was targeted because she had fallen foul of the city’s land mafia because she was placing their activities on record. They may both well be right, even if Qari Bilal was falsely accused by law-enforcement agencies.

The latest players in Karachi’s land grab — for long the domain of those with close links to the major political parties and forces amongst the establishment here — are TTP elements who have been putting down their roots in various parts of the city over the past couple of years.

Large swathes of Pakhtun neighborhoods in districts west and east, as well as pockets in districts Malir, central and south are reported to be under the influence of the TTP. While all 30 or so of its factions have a presence in the city, the most influence is wielded by the Hakimullah Mehsud and Mullah Fazlullah factions.

According to local police and residents of the affected areas, elements belonging to the TTP have entrenched themselves in these areas after having terrorised the local Pakhtun population into submission, and driven out the ANP from most of its traditional strongholds.

In the past few years, after it won two provincial seats in the 2008 elections and acquired real political clout in Karachi, the ANP and MQM frequently clashed in a deadly turf war. Both accused the other of killing its workers. In 2010 and 2011, when the MQM began to allege that the Taliban were acquiring a presence in the city, the ANP accused it of trying to use that claim as a pretext to ethnically cleanse Karachi of Pakhtuns. However, on 13th August 2012, when an attack in Frontier Colony killed local ANP office bearer and former UC nazim, Amir Sardar, and two party workers, the ANP did not accuse the MQM. Since then, numerous ANP offices have been shut down, scores of its workers killed and many driven out of Pakhtun-dominated areas. Qadir Khan, an ANP spokesman who has now joined the MQM, says “no political party or group can stand up to these militants”.

The TTP affirmed its presence in Karachi for the first time when the organization claimed responsibility for an attack on The Business Recorder/Aaj TV offices on 25 June, 2012 as a warning to rest of the media houses in the country.

The military operations in Swat and South Waziristan in 2009 triggered the latest wave of migration of Pakhtuns, compelling tens of thousands of residents to flee the fighting. Embedded within the exodus of these desperate internally displaced people (IDPs) were a number of Taliban fighters. Although the urban jungle that is Karachi had been a refuge for the latter even earlier, the untenable situation in their native areas prompted many of them to adopt a more permanent abode here.

Read more

mehreenkasana:

Pakistani Sunni and Shia praying Maghrib namaz together during the solidarity protest at Bilawal House, Karachi. After the Quetta blasts, protests broke out throughout the country in support of the Hazara community and other minorities. Via @Adbawany.

mehreenkasana:

Pakistani Sunni and Shia praying Maghrib namaz together during the solidarity protest at Bilawal House, Karachi. After the Quetta blasts, protests broke out throughout the country in support of the Hazara community and other minorities. Via @Adbawany.

Crime statistics gathered from governments, police departments and the UN show that Karachi has the highest homicide rate of the world’s 13 largest cities, coming in at 12.3 per 100,000 residents. Karachites often brush off the particularly violent nature of their city as being a byproduct of living in any major urban area in the developing world. But Karachi is exceptional; amongst megacities (with populations of more than 13 million), no other city’s homicide rate comes within 25 per cent of Karachi’s.

Al Jazeera compiles interactive data on Karachi. Wracked by endemic political violence and crime, Karachi is the world’s most dangerous megacity.

Karachi’s murder rate is comparable to the Brazilian city of Sao Paolo’s in the mid-2000s, when it was wracked with violence linked to organised crime and drugs, and was widely regarded as one of the most dangerous cities in the world. But Karachi’s story, a mix of crime (organised and otherwise) and political violence , remains largely unheard.

Majority of the violence remains ethnic and political between major political parties like ANP and MQM as indicated by the homicide data.

(via mehreenkasana)

(Source: english.aljazeera.net, via mehreenkasana)

mehreenkasana:

Two girls on a motorbike in Karachi, Pakistan. Massive swag. Photo brilliantly captured by Sonia Baweja as @soniabbbb on Instagram. Go follow her.
Look at the girl’s face. She doesn’t give a shit ‘cause she’s a badass.

Get it, girl.

mehreenkasana:

Two girls on a motorbike in Karachi, Pakistan. Massive swag. Photo brilliantly captured by Sonia Baweja as @soniabbbb on Instagram. Go follow her.

Look at the girl’s face. She doesn’t give a shit ‘cause she’s a badass.

Get it, girl.