FUCK YEAH SOUTH ASIA!

FUCK YEAH SOUTH ASIA is devoted to anything and everything about India, Pakistan, Afghanistan, Bangladesh, Sri Lanka, Nepal, Bhutan, Kashmir and the Maldives. This includes (but is not limited to) natural beauty, music, film, history, literature, news and politics, food, discussion of the diaspora, language lessons and much more. We feel that the view of South Asia that is often presented is very flat and one-dimensional and we hope to do our small bit to change that.

Members: kadalkavithaigal / sukoon / inautumn-inkashmir / waveofeuphoriaa / hinduthug / mehreenkasana / inlovewiththepractice / neharaysays / sombhatt / joethought

silenttemptress:

Sabyasachi’s design philosophy is ‘Personalized imperfection of the human hand’. Deserts, gypsies, prostitutes, antique textiles and cultural traditions of his home town, Kolkata, have been a lifelong inspiration for this designer who believes that “clothes should just be an extension of one’s intellect”. He uses unusual fabrics, texturing and detailing, ‘fusion’ of styles, ‘patch-work’ with embellishments in a vibrant colors. His creations evoke images of ancient and medieval ages. He describes his own collections as ‘an International styling with an Indian soul‟. In the designs, he tries to maintain a non commercial balance in an extremely aggressive, commercial and competitive industry. His collection is for people who prefer to walk a path less traveled and who definitely believe that slowing down is not equivalent to dropping out.

His signature style is originality, as he moves between stunningly crafted bridal wear and perfectly structured western statements. The designer draws his inspiration from art such as the colourscapes of French impressionists like Monet and Henry Matisse in his clothes.

He pioneered the use of Indian textiles in a modern context. His unique contribution was the use of indigenous methods like bandhani, gotawork, block printing, hand dyeing etc. in construction of modern silhouettes. [source]

[please expand for full quality!]

I love this so much.

(Source: pakoraholic, via idiosyntrinsic)

thepoliticalnotebook:


This Week in War. A Friday round-up of what happened and what’s been written in the world of war and military/security affairs this week. It’s a mix of news reports, policy briefs, blog posts and longform journalism. Subscribe here to receive this round-up by email.
Armed men raided the offices of Sudanese daily paper Al-Tayar on Saturday, confiscated and destroyed equipment, and beat the editor.
At Foreign Affairs: ”Why the Central African Republic has many peacekeepers, but no peace.”
Two explosions in Nigeria Wednesday, one targeting an opposition leader and another a prominent Muslim cleric, left at least 42 dead.
Clashes between militias in Libya left 47 dead last week.
21 Egyptian soldiers were killed in an attack on a border checkpoint over the weekend.
Amazing and terrible photos from the last couple of weeks in Gaza by Time's Alessio Romenzi. 
15 were killed yesterday when Israeli shelling struck a UN-run school in Gaza. The current death toll in Gaza has passed 800.
According to UN calculations, one child is killed every hour in Gaza.
The Israeli Broadcasting Authority has banned a radio ad from human rights group B’Tselem listing out the names of some of the dead Palestinian children from the past 17 days of conflict.
Clashes erupted in the West Bank as protests mounted against Israel’s shelling of a UN school in Gaza. Two Palestinian protesters were killed. A “day of rage” is planned for this, the last Friday of Ramadan.
A BBC interview with Hamas leader Khaled Meshaal.
The UN Human Rights Council has voted to launch an independent investigation into human rights violations in Israeli operations in Gaza. 29 voted in favor and 17 abstained. The sole “no” vote belonged to the United States. 
The Lebanese parliament failed for the ninth time to elect a new president. 
According to the Syrian opposition, last Thursday and Friday 700 Syrians were killed in conflict — the deadliest two days of fighting in the war. 
The UN sent trucks of food and other supplies across the Turkish border and into rebel-held Syrian territory, in defiance of the Syrian government. 
Iraqi parliament elected Kurdish politician Fouad Massoum the new president.
The veracity of the claim that ISIS called on Iraqi women to undergo genital mutilation is called into question.
Four journalists have been detained in Tehran, including Washington Post reporter Jason Rezaian and his wife, The National reporter Yeganeh Salehi.
Many obstacles block prosecution of those responsible for MH17.
Ukrainian Prime Minister Arseniy Yatsenyuk has resigned following the collapse of the governing coalition.
A Ukrainian journalist working as a freelancer for CNN was abducted Tuesday by pro-Russian separatists. 
A dispatch from the front lines with Ukrainian rebels.
RFE/RL interviews an Armenian who says he was recruited in Moscow to fight for the separatist movement in Ukraine.
A mass grave unearthed in Slovyansk, Ukraine, contains 20 bodies believed to have been killed by pro-Russian separatists. 
Ongoing questions about US intelligence prior to the downing of MH17.
C.J. Chivers on the continued dangers of Soviet surplus arms in Ukraine.  
Jon Lee Anderson on proxy war in Ukraine.
Six players for the football club Shakhtar Donetsk refused to return to the conflict-torn region of Ukraine after playing a friendly against France. One, Fred, has since returned.
The European Court of Human Rights found that Poland broke the human rights convention in assisting the CIA in the detention and torture of Abu Zubaydah and Abd al-Rahim al-Nashiri. Poland is the first to be held accountable for participation in CIA extraordinary rendition programs. 
Two Russian activists sentenced to four and a half years in a prison colony.
Two Finnish aid workers were shot dead in Herat, Afghanistan.
Matthew Rosenberg on the squabble-ridden audit of the Afghan election.
The Afghan police officer charged with killing AP photographer Anja Niedringhaus has been convicted and sentenced to death. 
15 members of the Hazara community were killed by Taliban gunmen as they travelled through the Afghan province of Ghor. 
Civilians caught in the crossfire in Myanmar’s northern Kachin state.
The National Journal on the broad parameters for putting someone on the terror watchlist.
A clip from the upcoming documentary The Kill Team by Dan Krauss, about the killing of civilians by a group of US soldiers in Afghanistan.
Photo: Gaza. A Palestinian man holds a young girl injured during the Israeli shelling of a UN school yesterday. Alessio Romenzi/TIME.
If you would like to receive this round-up as a weekly email, you can sign up through this form, or email me directly at torierosedeghett@gmail.com.

thepoliticalnotebook:

This Week in War. A Friday round-up of what happened and what’s been written in the world of war and military/security affairs this week. It’s a mix of news reports, policy briefs, blog posts and longform journalism. Subscribe here to receive this round-up by email.

Photo: Gaza. A Palestinian man holds a young girl injured during the Israeli shelling of a UN school yesterday. Alessio Romenzi/TIME.

If you would like to receive this round-up as a weekly email, you can sign up through this form, or email me directly at torierosedeghett@gmail.com.

Khumukcham Sanjita Chanu and Saikhom Mirabai Chanu bagged a gold and silver respectively, in the women’s 48kg weightlifting to open India’s medal account on the opening day of the competition in the XXth Commonwealth Games here on Thursday.

Khumukcham Sanjita Chanu and Saikhom Mirabai Chanu bagged a gold and silver respectively, in the women’s 48kg weightlifting to open India’s medal account on the opening day of the competition in the XXth Commonwealth Games here on Thursday.

mybollywoodobsession:

"A flowering plant, henna is used as a dye, particularly in hair colouring, and temporary body art known as mehndi (also written as mehendi or mehandi). The dye is extracted from the dried leaf and petioles of the plant. Mehndi is the application of henna as a temporary form of skin decoration. It is usually drawn on the hands and feet, where the designs will last the longest. "

(via flirtingwithfoolish-ness)