FUCK YEAH SOUTH ASIA!

FUCK YEAH SOUTH ASIA is devoted to anything and everything about India, Pakistan, Afghanistan, Bangladesh, Sri Lanka, Nepal, Bhutan, Kashmir and the Maldives. This includes (but is not limited to) natural beauty, music, film, history, literature, news and politics, food, discussion of the diaspora, language lessons and much more. We feel that the view of South Asia that is often presented is very flat and one-dimensional and we hope to do our small bit to change that.

Members: kadalkavithaigal / sukoon / inautumn-inkashmir / waveofeuphoriaa / hinduthug / mehreenkasana / daalbhat / inlovewiththepractice / neharaysays / sombhatt / joethought

portraitsofboston:

“My mother is Muslim, and my father is Hindu. At the time they got together, it was sort of a forbidden love.
So that’s my thing now—being open-minded about all sorts of people and places because you never know who you will fall in love with.”

portraitsofboston:

“My mother is Muslim, and my father is Hindu. At the time they got together, it was sort of a forbidden love.

So that’s my thing now—being open-minded about all sorts of people and places because you never know who you will fall in love with.”

(via fixed-stars)

sustii:

chingizhobbes:

"Blighty," a commonly used slang term referring to "England," comes from the Persian word velayat, which means “province.” In India, Europeans in general and the English especially were referred to by locals as “vilayati,” which was eventually corrupted by English speakers into “Blighty” to refer to their distant homeland. Surely only a Geordie could’ve mangled “vilayati" into "Blighty," right?

image

Woah how did I not know this

(via gharaajapardesi)

digitaldesperados:

These photos are from the archives of the Indian Express 2013 and capture moments from when women who are widows were allowed to join the Holi celebrations. 

They say “ Breaking the shackles of tradition, around 800 widows played Holi with gulal and flowers in the land of Lord Krishna, Vrindavan in four-day Holi celebrations that began on March 24. 

Vrindavan Holi is an effort to free widows from the shackles of age-old tradition. Not only will the widows play Holi, they will also participate in cultural programmes.

The widows feel such celebrations would prove to be an unprecedented step towards ending social prejudice against them. The event this year may need some amount of change in the mindset of the society.

However, the ‘breaking’ of traditions by widows in Vrindavan has drawn criticism from a section of religious leaders who believe that it is an ‘infringement of our ancient culture’.

In the past, widows living in the ashrams could have played Holi only with Thakurji (Lord Krishna).

A veteran in the popular Ram Lila act, Shankar Lal Chaturvedi criticised the event, saying, ‘The manner in which they smeared face of each other with gulal is not good.’ ”

The photos show the women (who are widows) praying, tossing flowers and generally celebrating Holi at at the Meera Sahavagini ashram in Vrindavan.



(via nagarvel)

parelima:

Ashmita Ranjit

Ranjit, a citizen of Nepal, is an interdisciplinary visual artist. Ranjit’s
works are designed to increase awareness of crucial ongoing social
and political issues of marginalized communities. She works with
groups of women, children and artists using a wide range of media:
drawing, painting, video, sound, installation, and performance. Ranjit’s
works also focuses on social injustice, human rights violations and
war in her country and around the world. She holds a MFA from
Columbia University Graduate School of Art. She also holds a BFA
from University of Tasmania, Australia as well as from Tribhuwan
University, Nepal. Ranjit has traveled and exhibited widely in Asia,
Europe, Australia,and the USA”.

Do the moderators of this page have any advice for a member of the Indian diaspora looking to self-study Hindi (starting from zero knowledge), living in the U.S.? (so no immersion opportunities). Thanks!

science-of-noise:

fuckyeahsouthasia:

I’m in the same boat as you. I speak Punjabi but I’m trying to pick up Hindi (which thankfully, is very similar). I use these resources:

http://www.amazon.com/gp/aw/d/080483962X/ref=mp_s_a_1_2?qid=1397916459&sr=8-2
http://www.amazon.com/gp/aw/d/0804839638/ref=aw_cm_cr_asin_lnk
http://www.amazon.com/gp/aw/d/0071736050/ref=mp_s_a_1_1?qid=1397916638&sr=8-1

And then of course, watch a lot of films so you can hear the language being used. Good luck!

A professor at NCSU made a video series of taped lessons that’s pretty good for beginners: http://taj.chass.ncsu.edu

I think Disney Channel India has also made a few Hindi language versions of American Disney Channel sitcoms.  Given that (I think) these are basically direct translations aside from some cultural stuff, that also seems like a good avenue if you can find them.

Do the moderators of this page have any advice for a member of the Indian diaspora looking to self-study Hindi (starting from zero knowledge), living in the U.S.? (so no immersion opportunities). Thanks!

I’m in the same boat as you. I speak Punjabi but I’m trying to pick up Hindi (which thankfully, is very similar). I use these resources:

http://www.amazon.com/gp/aw/d/080483962X/ref=mp_s_a_1_2?qid=1397916459&sr=8-2
http://www.amazon.com/gp/aw/d/0804839638/ref=aw_cm_cr_asin_lnk
http://www.amazon.com/gp/aw/d/0071736050/ref=mp_s_a_1_1?qid=1397916638&sr=8-1

And then of course, watch a lot of films so you can hear the language being used. Good luck!

Hey! I was wondering if you could translate that Mirza Ghalib couplet for me. I'm trying to learn Urdu/Hindi, but poetry is sometimes really hard for me to understand =)

Don’t set store by fate lines on hands
Even those without hands have fates/destinies

mughalshit:


Taj Mahal
India (Agra), approx. 1860 - 1880
Albumen silver print

 The Taj Mahal, built between 1632 and 1643 under the Mughal emperor Shah Jahan (reigned 1627– 1658) for his favorite wife, Mumtaz Mahal, is one of the most photographed buildings in the world. Most visitors to India today try to include it in their itineraries. This was also true in the 1800s, but in that period few people had their own cameras, so nearly all tourists had to buy professional pictures from important photographic studios in India and elsewhere.  Photographer Francis Frith (British, 1822– 1898) never went to India himself, but he established an important firm that offered views from all over the world— including many photographs of Indian buildings and scenery— acquired from a large number of his contemporaries.This image shows an interesting view of the Taj Mahal. The earliest sketches and photographs were usually taken from the riverside because, as suggested by this photograph, the trees of the gardens were so tall they hid some of the structure. In order to allow for a view of the whole tomb with its four minarets, photographs were taken from high atop the gateway at the entrance to the gardens. It is far less common to find pictures from inside the garden; only an impression of the whole can be gotten from such an intimate view.

mughalshit:

Taj Mahal

India (Agra), approx. 1860 - 1880

Albumen silver print

The Taj Mahal, built between 1632 and 1643 under the Mughal emperor Shah Jahan (reigned 1627– 1658) for his favorite wife, Mumtaz Mahal, is one of the most photographed buildings in the world. Most visitors to India today try to include it in their itineraries. This was also true in the 1800s, but in that period few people had their own cameras, so nearly all tourists had to buy professional pictures from important photographic studios in India and elsewhere.  Photographer Francis Frith (British, 1822– 1898) never went to India himself, but he established an important firm that offered views from all over the world— including many photographs of Indian buildings and scenery— acquired from a large number of his contemporaries.

This image shows an interesting view of the Taj Mahal. The earliest sketches and photographs were usually taken from the riverside because, as suggested by this photograph, the trees of the gardens were so tall they hid some of the structure. In order to allow for a view of the whole tomb with its four minarets, photographs were taken from high atop the gateway at the entrance to the gardens. It is far less common to find pictures from inside the garden; only an impression of the whole can be gotten from such an intimate view.

(Source: searchcollection.asianart.org, via bhagyawati)

Is fat really the worst thing a human being can be? Is fat worse than vindictive, jealous, shallow, vain, boring, evil, or cruel? Not to me.

J. K. Rowling

(Source: sandflies, via rsvnr)