FUCK YEAH SOUTH ASIA!

FUCK YEAH SOUTH ASIA is devoted to anything and everything about India, Pakistan, Afghanistan, Bangladesh, Sri Lanka, Nepal, Bhutan, Kashmir and the Maldives. This includes (but is not limited to) natural beauty, music, film, history, literature, news and politics, food, discussion of the diaspora, language lessons and much more. We feel that the view of South Asia that is often presented is very flat and one-dimensional and we hope to do our small bit to change that.

Members: kadalkavithaigal / sukoon / inautumn-inkashmir / waveofeuphoriaa / hinduthug / mehreenkasana / inlovewiththepractice / neharaysays / sombhatt

gham-geen:

Afghanistan has literally nothing but themselves time and time again. The world fails them time and time again.

Our children are murdered and each and every time the world forgets to do anything about it.

Vesak festival, Sri Lanka.

Vesak is celebrated as a religious and a cultural festival in Sri Lanka on the full moon of the month of May, for duration of one week. During this week, the selling of alcohol and flesh is usually prohibited, with abattoirs also being closed. Celebrations include various religious and alms giving activities. Electrically lit pandals called Toranas are erected in various locations mainly in Colombo, Kandy, Galle and elsewhere; most sponsored by donors, religious societies and welfare groups. Each Pandal illustrates a story from the 550 Jataka Katha or the 550 Past Life Stories of the Buddha. In addition, colourful lanterns called Vesak koodu are hung along streets and in front of homes. They signify the light of the Buddha, Dharma and the Sangha. Food stalls set up by Buddhist devotees called Dansalas provide free food and drinks to passersby. Groups of people from various community organizations, businesses and government departments sing Bhakti gee or Buddhist devotional songs. Colombo experiences a massive influx of public from all parts of the country during this week.

(Source: fromsouthasiawithlove)

brahmaanda:

The Nasadiya Sukta, also known as the Hymn of Creation, is the 129th hymn of the 10th Mandala of the Rigveda (10:129). It is concerned with cosmology and the origin of the universe. The hymn has been interpreted as one of the earliest accounts of skeptical inquiry and agnosticism. Astronomer Carl Sagan quoted it in discussing India’s “tradition of skeptical questioning and unselfconscious humility before the great cosmic mysteries.”

Then even nothingness was not, nor existence,
There was no air then, nor the heavens beyond it.
What covered it? Where was it? In whose keeping
Was there then cosmic water, in depths unfathomed?

Then there was neither death nor immortality
nor was there then the torch of night and day.
The One breathed windlessly and self-sustaining.
There was that One then, and there was no other.

At first there was only darkness wrapped in darkness.
All this was only unillumined water.
That One which came to be, enclosed in nothing,
arose at last, born of the power of heat.

In the beginning desire descended on it -
that was the primal seed, born of the mind.
The sages who have searched their hearts with wisdom
know that which is is kin to that which is not.

And they have stretched their cord across the void,
and know what was above, and what below.
Seminal powers made fertile mighty forces.
Below was strength, and over it was impulse.

But, after all, who knows, and who can say
Whence it all came, and how creation happened?
the gods themselves are later than creation,
so who knows truly whence it has arisen?

Whence all creation had its origin,
he, whether he fashioned it or whether he did not,
he, who surveys it all from highest heaven,
he knows - or maybe even he does not know.

Advertising should not communicate any discrimination as a result of skin colour. These ads should not reinforce negative social stereotyping on the basis of skin colour. Specifically, advertising should not directly or implicitly show people with darker skin in a way which is widely seen as unattractive, unhappy, depressed, or concerned. These ads should not portray people with darker skin in a way which is widely seen as at a disadvantage of any kind, or inferior, or unsuccessful in any aspect of life particularly in relation to being attractive to the opposite sex, matrimony, job placement, promotions, and other prospects.

In the pre-usage depiction of product, special care should be taken to ensure that the expression of the model/s in the real and graphical representation should not be negative in a way which is widely seen as unattractive, unhappy, depressed, or concerned.

Advertising should not associate darker or lighter colour skin with any particular socio-economic strata, caste, community, religion, profession, or ethnicity.

Advertising should not perpetuate gender-based discrimination because of skin colour.

ancientart:

The Bhaja Caves of Maharashtra, India.

Bhaja contains about 29 rock-cut caves, which date back to the 2nd century BCE, and is described by the Archaeological Survey of India to be “one of the important Buddhist centres of Hinayana faith in Maharashtra.” 

A prominent features of Bhaja is Cave 12, a chaitya-griha, pictured in the final photo, which is considered one of the earliest of its kind. The stupa at the back of the large apsidal hall was used for worship. Cave 20 contains a group of stupas, which were built in memory of deceased monks, and probably once contained their relics.

Cave 18 was a monastery, and its verandah contains two famous sculpted reliefs. One of these (pictured in the 2nd photo) is located to the left of the door. This artwork depicts a person riding an elephant (thought by some to be Indra) who carries an ankusa (elephant goad), with attendants aside the figure, carrying a banner. The second relief shows a royal personage aside two women. The royal figure (who some identify as Sun god Surya), rides a chariot driven by four horses, and appears to be trampling a demon-like figure.

Photos courtesy of & taken by Himanshu Sarpotdar. The write-up of the site done by the Archaeological Survey of India was of great reference to me when writing this post.

arnehoel:

A few shots from the 2011 Bangladesh shoot - including a portrait of eight-year-old Zannati who lives on the front lines of climate change in the cyclone-ravaged coastal village of Nishanbaria on the Bay of Bengal.

In an interview, Zanati said: “My village is beautiful and I have lived here all my life. Even though life can be hard, I don’t want to go away.”

Zanati has already seen her village devastated by cyclones twice in her young life, but shows remarkable optimism and determination to continue going to school and living a normal life even in the face of such adversity.